Category Archives: holiday storage

The Reindeer Revue

“Here Comes Santa Claus, Here Comes Santa Claus!” 

Yes, December is here and the storage staff and storage customers here at The Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township, NJ, are getting into the Christmas spirit!

Earlier today, one of our storage space tenants, Derek, stopped into the storage rental office to retrieve holiday decorations and pick up storage supplies including cardboard boxes and tape.

We got to chatting and it turns out that both of our granddaughters go to the same school, and they’re playing reindeer in the same holiday play! My granddaughter Madison is Vixen, and Derek’s grandaughter is Rudolph. We joked about how his granddaughter had the more famous part and agreed to see each other there.

Our conversation made me wonder, “why reindeer?” –  “why not horses?”, so I decided to check it out…

Reindeer are a well-known part of Christmas lore, but you might not be aware that their part of the Christmas tradition is less than 200 years old. Here are some fun facts about reindeer and their role in Christmas legend!

Reindeer Fun Facts

In North America, reindeer are known as caribou.

Reindeer live in the northernmost parts of the world like the Arctic, Northern Europe and Siberia. This explains why reindeer lead Santa’s sleigh – he needed animals that could live at the North Pole!

The name “Reindeer” comes from the Norse word “hreinn,” meaning deer.

Both male and female reindeer grow antlers; there’s no way to be sure, but that could mean that Santa’s reindeer were in fact female.

Reindeer are good at surviving in harsh and cold environments. Their noses actually warm the air before they breathe it in, so that their lungs don’t freeze.

Santa’s Reindeer

Santa’s reindeer made their first official appearance in 1823 in Clement C. Moore’s poem “The Night Before Christmas,” where he introduced the “eight tiny reindeer” that lead Santa’s sleigh through the night.

The original reindeer were Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder, and Blixen (later known as Donner and Blitzen). The names Dunder and Blixen translate from German as thunder and lightning.

 

Some people leave carrots for Santa’s reindeer as a special treat on Christmas Eve, but you might want to think about leaving moss instead – that’s a real reindeers favorite food!

Originally, Santa only had 8 reindeer until…..

Rudolph is a newbie!

Rudolph wasn’t an original member of Santa’s reindeer team – The little red-nosed reindeer didn’t make an appearance in popular culture until 1939, when department store Montgomery Ward hired writer Robert L. May to write a book starring a brand new Christmas character.

In 1949, Rudolph’s story was adapted into the famous song, originally recorded by singing cowboy, Gene Autry.

The beloved, stop-motion movie version of Rudolph’s story first aired on December 6, 1964, and has aired countless times each year since then!

To celebrate his 75th birthday, the United States Postal Service issued a set of Rudolph stamps in November 2014.

Reindeer clearly have a lot of significance in Christmas legend. It’s amazing to think how important Rudolph is to the modern North American concept of Christmas, considering that he’s only 76 years old!

As for me, all of this talk about Santa and his Reindeer has made me hungry for some warm Christmas cookies and a nice glass of milk!
Happy Holidays from The Storage Inn!

 

My Veteran’s Day Visitor

It’s been a cold and blustery start to November in South Jersey, but things at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, are as busy as ever. Yesterday our rental office was buzzing with new customers securing storage units or buying packing supplies, as well as current self storage customers just stopping in to check grab items from their units.

In the middle of all the hustle and bustle in strolled a young man in uniform. I recognized him instantly! It was my nephew, Ryan, on his way home and on leave from the Army, just in time for Veterans Day weekend.

I came around the counter and gave him a big handshake and hug! “You here to store the Army’s arsenal of equipment at The Storage Inn?” I asked laughing.

He just grinned and said,”You would need a lot more space than you’ve got here!”. We had a nice conversation after which we both laughed and promised to visit again before he returned to base.

That got me thinking, I wonder just how much equipment the US military would actually have to store? I did some research…

Manpower

The U.S. Military has over 2,000,000 personnel including active and reserve! (We won’t be storing personnel)



Airpower

Total Aircraft Strength – 13,362. Including over 4,000 fighter and attack aircraft and nearly 6,000 helicopters!

Land

5,884 Combat tanks
38,882 Armored fighting vehicles
950 self-propelled artillery vehicles
795 pieces of Towed Artillery
1,197 Rocket Projectors

Naval

20 Aircraft Carriers
65 Destroyers
10 Frigates
66 Submarines
13 Patrol vessels
11 Minesweepers

So there you have it, the latest published inventory of our United States armed forces equipment.

I saw my nephew Ryan at a family gathering last night and showed him my research, very proud of my facts and figures. He stared at it for a moment, looked up at me and grinned and said “Uncle Jerry, this is just the stuff that you’re allowed to know about”. We laughed as I thanked him for his service, and gave him a big hug before heading home.

Well, my research has certainly taught me one thing… Even though The Storage Inn is the largest self storage facility in the EHT area, we would need a pretty significant major expansion to store all of the military’s items. Happy Veterans Day!

 

It’s a “Boo”-tiful day in the Neighborhood!

Happy Halloween from The Storage Inn

It’s almost Halloween here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey (cue spooky music) – Time to stock up on candy for the storage rental office ! The 31st will bring costumed visitors from some of our storage space tenants, as well as some of our neighborhood kids. One thing that I have noticed on my drive home from our self storage facility, is that it seems that more people decorate the exterior of their homes for Halloween than ever – some of those decorations are quite spectacular, and I assume, pretty expensive! This got me wondering just how much time and money is spent on Halloween in this day and age, so I did a little digging. Here is what I found.

A Brief History of Halloween

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Halloween is a holiday that straddles the line between Fall and Winter, plenty and scarcity, and even life and death. The ancient Celts celebrated their New Year on November 1st, making October 31st a sort of New Year’s Eve for them. It was said that on this day, the ghosts of the dead would return to Earth. This is believed to be the origin of celebrating Halloween by dressing as ghosts, witches, and skeletons. Eventually Halloween evolved into the secular, community-based event that we know today, characterized by Halloween parties and trick or treating.

Halloween by the Numbers

$69 Billion – Total that will be spent on Halloween this year!

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$360 Million  – On Halloween greeting cards (Wow – who knew!)

$4 Billion – Will be spent on candy and decorations

158 Million will celebrate Halloween in some fashion

36 Million ages 5 – 13 will go Trick or Treating

51% of families will decorate their yards

20% of families will carve a pumpkin

24% of US households do not celebrate Halloween – Boooooooooooo!

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Costume Ideas

Where do we get our inspiration from?

35% – Halloween/Costume store

32% – Social Media

20% – Print Media

11% – Friends / Word of mouth

OK – so now you have some facts and figures about Halloween that you can spring on your friends while they’re bobbing for apples at the Halloween party! To all our readers of “The Storage Inn blog”, I’ll leave you with a Halloween joke.

What does a ghost use to wash his hair?
Shamboo!

Happy Halloween everyone!


This could be one of the coldest New Year’s Eves in 40 years! Bundle up!

Baby it’s Cold Outside!

The New Year is almost here, and we here at The Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, are experiencing some of the coldest weather in recent memory. Luckily for our storage space customers, we’ve unboxed the long johns and stocked up on lock de-icer to help them through this cold snap! I asked one of our rental customers, who also happens to be a police officer, what he found to be the biggest problem during cold weather like this. Without hesitating, he said “fires caused by people trying to keep warm using space heaters, or other inventive methods. We all want to be warm, but we have to be safe too.”

On that note, here are some tips from our local Police and Fire departments on staying safe and warm during extreme cold!

Layers, Layers, Layers!

It might seem obvious, but piling on a few extra layers is a great way to stay warm, especially if you have to be outside. Keeping your core warm is especially important when temperatures dip below freezing. Air gets trapped between the layers of clothing, and is heated by your body, allowing you to stay warmer than with one heavy garment..

Eat to Keep the Heat

You already know that eating healthy in the winter can help to fend off colds and the flu, but did you know it might help keep you warm, too? Eating extra healthy fats during the winter can help rev up metabolism, which in turn heats the body.

If your New Year’s resolution was to drop a few pounds, don’t worry – you can always skip the extra fat and try eating warmer foods and drinks including soups, spicy foods, hot coffee and teas to fend off the chill!

It May Seem like a Good Idea, but…..

Although alcoholic beverages might make you feel warm, they actually decrease your core temperature and can be dangerous during winter months.

Alcohol actually reverses some reflexes that control body temperature, especially the body’s ability to shiver. Alcohol can also make you sweat, even when it is cold, which can lower core temperatures even more. Save the cocktail until you’re in for the night!

Keep your Fingers and Toes Toasty

Hypothermia is most likely to begin in extremities like your hands and feet, so keeping your fingers and toes warm is important. Whether you’re walking to work or just around the block, make sure to wear sturdy, insulated shoes that will help prevent slips on slick surfaces and keep your feet dry. Also wear insulated gloves or mittens.

Give your Space Heater some Space!

Space heaters are a great way to add extra heat to colder rooms, but always remember to keep flammable items including clothing, rugs, bedding and curtains at least three feet away from the heater at all times. Also remember to place the heater on a hard, non-flammable, stable surface and to turn it off completely before leaving the house. Set a reminder on your phone if you’re afraid you’ll forget.

Don’t Forget our Furry Friends

Always remember to bring pets inside when temperatures begin to drop. You might be jealous of your dog or cat’s fur coat when temperatures drop, but they need to be kept warm too. Limit the length of their walks, particularly on snowy or icy surfaces.

Keep an Eye on the Fire

It’s easy to snooze in front of a roaring fire, but always make sure that fireplace embers are completely out before going to bed for the night.
Wood fireplaces should always have a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs.

Keep Important Phone Numbers Handy

Heavy snow and ice can settle on power lines and cause power outages. Write down utility numbers and have them handy during a storm in case you need to report an outage or incident.

Check in on Elderly Friends and Neighbors

Here are a few things you can check:
Do they have heat in the home?
Do they have hot water?
Are all their appliances working properly?
Are their pipes, sprinkler system and faucets protected against freezing?
Is their phone operational?
Do they have the phone number of someone they can call for minor emergencies? Yours?
Please don’t wait until something tragic happens. Take a few minutes to help a neighbor. It’s well worth your time.

So, there you are – some great tips to help you deal with the cold weather. From the staff here at The Storage Inn, have a Warm, Safe and Happy New Year! 

 

Military Families on the Move

Moving is part of everyday life for military personnel. Soldiers and their families may be asked to relocate every 2 to 4 years. These moves often take place with short notice, requiring quick planning.

Military personnel who are about to deploy have a lot of choices to make regarding what items to take with them, and what to place into storage. A self storage unit can be a great option, not only for furniture, electronics, and appliances, but also storing a vehicle such as cars, trucks, motorcycles, and boats. Your local self storage facility will likely offer military self storage discounts for storage units as well as packing supplies, and possibly even the free use of a moving truck or moving van like we offer at The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township, NJ , and The Storage Inn II of Ocean City NJ. Most military bases have self storage facilities located near to them that offer secure gated storage – some even have resident security managers and climate controlled storage units. Many storage facilities also offer your choice of affordable indoor or outdoor space for vehicle storage.

Surface Deployment and Distribution Command are part of relocation departments designed to help military families with their moves. These departments also offer moving check lists like the one below.

Moving Tips for Military Families

Military families are expert movers! Here are some tips for moving with the military that should help make the moving process as smooth as possible!

1. Have a playbook with the moving orders, important dates and other documentation. Create a detailed list of everything that is to be moved.

2. Begin “decluttering” as soon as possible. Sort through items and designate them as sell, donate, or store – having less items to pack and move helps reduce stress on moving day

3. Have family and friends help with cleaning the old home when it is empty. It is also recommended to pre-clean the bathroom and kitchen in your new home.

4. Pack a “Go” bag for the first day at your new home with items such as sheets, towels, shower curtains and soap. Military families may not be able to control what goes where on their moving trucks, making it difficult to find items like laundry soap, brooms, mops, and household cleaners until the truck is completely unpacked. Quick and efficient planning is the key, but then, being quick and efficient is probably second nature to most military family members!

If you’re a member of a military family, The folks at The Storage Inn would love to help. Stop in and see us, and Thank You for your service! Happy Veterans Day!

Remember those you gave their lives for our freedom.

Remembering the Real Meaning of Memorial Day

Memorial Day weekend is finally upon us, and the yard is buzzing here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. People are visiting their storage units, retrieving their barbecue grills and beach chairs in preparation for the big weekend. As I watch the busy storage yard activity, it occurs to me that many of our tenants and quite a few of our employees are veterans.

Oftentimes we so get wrapped up in big holiday weekend plans with BBQs and beach time, that we forget the real reason for many holidays, including Memorial Day – A day to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. To help put things in perspective, below are casualty statistics from the greatest battles in US history.

Highest Casualty Battles in U.S.History

  1. Battle of Meuse-Argonne World War I: 26,277
  2. Battle of the Bulge (WW2) 19,276
  3. Battle of Okinawa (WW2) 12,513
  4. Battle of Gettysburg (Civil) 7,863
  5. Battle of Guadalcanal (WW2) 7,099
  6. Battle of Iwo Jima (WW2) 6,821
  7. Antietam (Civil) 3,654
  8. Battle of Shiloh (Civil) 3,482
  9. Bull Run II (Civil) 3,000
  10. Battle of Saipan (WW2) 2,949

Some famous battles that do not make the list:

Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor: 2,403
Tet Offensive Vietnam War: 1536
Invasion of Normandy (WW2) 1,465

So, as you’re biting into that hamburger, and cooling off with a cold one, take a moment to remember those who gave their lives, to preserve our American way of life.  Have a great Memorial Day weekend, and God Bless America!

Happy Valentine's Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day From The Storage Inn

Lots of Cards and The Legend of Saint Valentine

It’s a cold February day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. One of our storage space tenants, Mrs Ragnoli, just stopped in to the office for some boxes and bubble wrap, but before she left, she said, “ Don’t forget to buy your wife roses – you know Tuesday is Valentine’s Day!”. “She’s right“ I thought – “ I also need to make a dinner reservation”.

Speaking of Valentine’s Day I recently read that approximately 150 million Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged annually, making Valentine’s Day the second most popular card-sending holiday after Christmas,.This made me think. “ What is this holiday really about other than roses, cards, and chocolates? And what size self storage space would hold 150 million greeting cards?”

The Man, the Myth, the Legend

I checked it out and found that the history of Saint Valentine’s Day is shrouded in mystery. Who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with a holiday that celebrates love? One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death.  According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first “valentine” greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl, possibly his jailer’s daughter, who visited him during his confinement. It’s alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today.

At the end of the 5th century, Pope Gelasius declared February 14th  St. Valentine’s Day. It was not until much later, however, that the day became definitively associated with love. During the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed in France and England that February 14th was the beginning of the mating season for birds, which added to the idea that Valentine’s Day should be a day for romance.Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine’s didn’t begin to appear until after 1400.

Love American Style

Valentine’s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the 17th century. By the middle of the 18th, it was common for friends and lovers of all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection or handwritten notes, and by 1900 printed cards began to replace written letters .

Americans probably began exchanging hand-made valentines in the early 1700s. In the 1840s, Esther A. Howland began selling the first mass-produced valentines in America. Howland, known as the “Mother of the Valentine,” made elaborate creations with real lace, ribbons and colorful pictures. Today, according to the Greeting Card Association,Valentine’s Day is the second largest card-sending holiday and women purchase approximately 85 percent of all valentines.

Storing 150 Million Valentine’s Day Cards

This is certainly an approximation because there is a wide variety of card sizes and shapes, but if a customer wanted to store 150 million cards that were 4 x 6 inches and printed on 100lb cardstock (.011 inches thickness x 2 sides) it would take about 45,833 cubic feet. To put that into perspective, we would need about 46 storage units that were 10 foot tall x 10 foot wide x 10 foot deep. That’s a lot of cards!

So there you have it – Valentine’s day is about buying cards and eating Chocolate! – Just kidding!  It’s actually about Love and Romance and Taking the Time to tell your special somebody that you care. Happy Valentines Day to All from the staff at The Storage Inn!

Happy 2017!

Happy New Years Everyone!

Self Storage and New Years Resolutions

It’s almost New Year’s Day here at the Storage Inn Self Storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and I’m hearing a lot of our customers talking about their plans for 2017 –  things like being healthier, more financially responsible, and of course, getting organized. Yesterday I met a nice lady, Mrs. Saymon, who not only rented a storage space at our The Storage Inn II  in Ocean City NJ, but also took advantage of our Free Moving Truck Rental.

“Are you moving?” I inquired.

“Nope – Just getting organized – It’s my New Years resolution.” she replied, eyes rolling.

We talked a bit, I wished her luck, and she was on her way to get a head start on her resolutions for 2017.

I’ve made many New Year’s resolutions over the years, (few of which I’ve actually kept!), but this made me wonder where this tradition of making promises to oneself actually originated.

So where did New Year’s Resolutions begin?

Our modern day “New Year” started when Julius Caesar introduced the Gregorian Calendar. He moved the first day of the year to January 1st in honor of Janus the Roman God of beginnings.  However, Caesar’s idea didn’t quite catch on until it was made official in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. The Gregorian calendar is the same one that we use today.

But! It Goes Back Even Further Than The Romans!

It turns out the New Years concept actually started about four thousand years ago with the Babylonians. They rang in their New Year with an eleven day festival in March. These folks started it all by making promises to their gods, in hopes they would earn good favor in the New Year. One of their favorite resolutions was to get out of debt – sound familiar? Historians are unclear on whether or not the Babylonians resolved to be healthier. My research suggests however that the ancient Babylonians did not have to deal with the temptations provided by their local McDonald’s or Dairy Queen!

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So there it is folks. We continue to celebrate a tradition passed on from generation to generation even after all these years! And so time marches on, and the New Year will come and it will go. But this year, I’m determined to shed those extra pounds. Granted I weigh just about the same as I did last year when I made this New Year’s goal! 

It’s been so long how do I get to the gym again? – oh, that’s right – you make a right at McDonald’s, and it’s across the street from the Dairy Queen! Good luck, and Happy New Year everyone! 

Where did Santa’s Reindeer come from?

Why Does Santa Use Reindeer?

A few fun holiday facts from The Storage Inn

Where did Santa’s reindeer come from?

Here at The Storage Inn self storage in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, we are well-known by our iconic, blue and yellow horse carriage that sits right in front of the storage facility, but during the holiday season, we also bring out our big blue and yellow sleigh as part of our holiday decorations.

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As I watched our customers roll in and out through the security gate, for whatever reason it got me wondering about how reindeer became associated with Santa’s sleigh.  I know that in early American life, sleighs were pulled by horses as a means to get around during snowy weather… so where did Santa’s reindeer come from? Well, I did a little research, and here’s what I found out courtesy of KidzWorld.com

Reindeer Fun Facts

Santa’s reindeer made their first official appearance less than 200 years ago in 1823, when Clement C. Moore published the poem “The Night Before Christmas,” where he says that “eight tiny rein-deer” led Santa’s sleigh through the night

In North America, reindeer are also known as caribou.

Reindeer live in the northernmost parts of the world; they’re native to Arctic regions, as well as northern Europe and Siberia. This facts explains why reindeer were ideal for leading Santa’s sleigh – since he needs animals that can survive at the North Pole!

The name “reindeer” comes from the Norse word “hreinn,” meaning deer.

Both male and female reindeer grow antlers; there’s no way to be sure, but that could mean that Santa’s reindeer were in fact female.

Reindeer are uniquely capable of living in harsh and cold environments. Their noses actually warm the air before they breathe it in, so that their lungs don’t freeze.

The original reindeer were Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder, and Blixem (later known as Donner and Blitzen).

The names Donder and Blitzen translate from German as thunder and lightning.

Some people like to leave carrots for Santa’s reindeer as a special treat on Christmas Eve, but think about leaving moss instead – that’s a real reindeer’s favorite food!

Rudolph Fun Facts

As for the most famous reindeer of all, Rudolph, wasn’t an original member of Santa’s reindeer posse. The little red-nosed reindeer didn’t make an appearance in popular culture until 1939, when department store Montgomery Ward hired writer Robert L. May to write a book starring a brand new Christmas character.

Rudolph’s story was adapted into the famous song, still sung today, in 1949.

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The much loved stop-motion movie version of Rudolph’s story first aired on December 6, 1964, and has aired countless times each year since then!

To celebrate his 75th birthday, the United States Postal Service issued a set of Rudolph stamps in November 2014

With all these amazing facts, it’s clear Reindeer have a place of significance in Christmas legend. It’s amazing to think how important Rudolph is to the modern North American concept of Christmas, considering that he’s only 76 years old!

We hope you enjoyed our fun reindeer facts and it won’t be long now. Keep an ear to the air and listen for those familiar hoof steps on your roof top. Happy Holidays from The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, NJ and The Storage Inn II in Ocean City, NJ!!!

Scams Increase During the Holidays

The Twelve Scams of Christmas!

The Twelve Scams of Christmas

Here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, we get our fair share of suspicious activity including emails asking us to click on questionable links, and scam phone calls trying to get donations. I’ve even had one of our more senior storage space customers tell me about an email that she had received regarding the estate of a distant, unknown relative, who had passed away in another country. The scammer was requesting that she send money in order to get the funds out of Africa. Thank goodness she didn’t fall for it!

It definitely seems like the scammers increase their activity around the holiday season, probably because most people are in more of a giving mood than usual? I checked with the Better Business Bureau, and found out that my suspicions were correct – More scams are reported during the holiday season than any other time of year!

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The Better Business Bureau has some interesting facts about holiday shopping scams. Here are their “Twelve Scams of Christmas”!

1. Mystery Shopper scams: The most common are text messages enticing people to sign up to become a part-time mystery shopper for say $400 or more per gig. It may be tempting to earn some extra cash this time of year, but it’s actually a scam looking for financial and bank information.
2. Social Media Gift Exchanges: Has someone on social media asked you to take part in a Christmas gift exchange that will result in you getting 36 gifts? While it may sound good, promptly decline. It’s a pyramid scam, which is illegal.
3. Pet scams: It’s a popular gift, but be careful about buying a pet online. Puppy mills and fake pedigrees are common. Make sure breeders are reputable or you may end up with a sick animal.
4. Malware Holiday e-cards: Most people are aware of the dangers of clicking on url links to malware in the email they receive, but the scams are still out there, so beware.
5. Stranded grandkids: If a grandchild or other relative, who is ‘stranded’ or in ‘trouble’ in another country, sends an email looking for money, double check with family first, no matter how urgent it seems. This is a scam that has taken unsuspecting relatives for thousands of dollars!
6. Pickpockets: They usually strike when you’re not paying attention. Keep your purse or wallet secure when shopping. Don’t get overburdened or put shopping bags down.

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7. Stolen gift cards: Buy gift cards from reputable dealers or in store, not online or from individuals. Scammers sell the card, then remove the funds before you hand over the gift.
8. Santa scammers: Double check on websites that offer to send your child a letter from Santa. This may be a scam looking for personal information.
9. Fake charities: Charities are active during the Christmas season, but be wary of charities that seem suspect. Do your homework before you give.
10. Online ads for hot toys and gadgets: Scammers prey on parents desperate for the latest toy their child is asking for from Santa and might be tempted to buy them online. Never make a purchases unless you see the https:// in front of the website’s domain name. If there’s no contact information for the seller you may want to avoid the purchase. They may ask for payment by wire or money card which is another red flag. If you’re not sure how reputable the company is, try calling the vendor and speak to customer service to feel them out. Search for reviews of the company online. Try Googling the company name followed by the word “scam” to see if any results show up.
11. Travel scams: Be cautious when booking through online ads for a last-minute getaway. Ask for references and never hand over money to someone you haven’t checked out first.
12. Romance scams: It’s tough to be alone during the holidays, but if your new online love starts asking for money, especially early on, and definitely if you haven’t even met yet… run! They aren’t who they claim to be.
Hopefully these tips will help you to be a smart Santa this holiday season – Happy Holidays from The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township NJ and The Storage Inn II in Ocean City New Jersey!

To find out more about scams in your area, or to report a scam visit the BBB’s Scam Tracker.