Category Archives: Fun Facts

Jumping Into Leap Year

Storage Inn Leap Year Blog Post

February 2020 is rolling along here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, but the cold weather does not seem to have slowed down our self-storage customers at all! Our storage rental facility is bustling with self-storage customers!

Yesterday, a nice young man was renting one of our storage units, he commented on how busy we are.

“ It’s like this 365 days a year” I replied.

“366 days this year” replied Jake, our new tenant. 

“Ahhhh – right. It’s a leap year” I mused, as Jake and I finished his paperwork for our Free Moving Truck Rental program. This made me wonder… what is Leap Year, and why do we do it?

Why do we have one extra day at the end of February every four years?

Here are some fun facts about a leap year and leap days….

Why add a leap day?

Feb. 29 is leap day; the day inserted into the calendar every four years to keep our calendar operating smoothly. This extra day makes the year 366 days long, instead of 365 days like regular years. Leap days are needed to keep our calendar in alignment with the Earth’s revolutions around the Sun. We use “leap year” because each date on the calendar jumps ahead two days of the week instead of one.

It takes the Earth approximately 365.242189 days – or 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds – to circle once around the Sun. This is called a tropical year. Without an extra day on February 29 nearly every four years, we would lose almost six hours every year. After only 100 years, our calendar would be off by approximately 24 days.

All Hail Caesar

Julius Caesar introduced the first leap year around 46 B.C., but his Julian calendar had only one rule: Any year evenly divisible by four would be a leap year. That created too many leap years. (Pope Gregory XIII introduced his Gregorian calendar more than 1,500 years later which helped to fix this issue.)

Leap Year Calculations

There’s a leap year every year that is divisible by the number 4, except for years that are both divisible by 100 and not divisible by 400. The year 2000 was a leap year, but the years 1700, 1800 and 1900 were not. The added rule about centuries (versus just every four years) was an additional fix to make up for the fact that an extra day every 4 years is too much of a correction.

Leap Months in other countries

A whole leap month is added to the Chinese calendar every three years. The leap month’s place in the Chinese calendar varies from year to year, and 2015 was a leap year in the Chinese calendar.

A leap year in the Ethiopian calendar occurs when an extra day is added to the last month of the year every four years.

Leap Year Traditions

It’s acceptable for a woman to propose to a man on Feb. 29. The custom has been attributed to St. Bridget, who is said to have complained to St.
Patrick about women having to wait for men to propose marriage. Patrick supposedly gave women one day to propose.

Leap Year Babies

People born on leap day are often called “leaplings” or “leapers.” Most of them celebrate their birthday on Feb. 28 or March 1 on non-leap years.

Leap Year Capital

The twin cities of Anthony, Texas, and Anthony, New Mexico, are the self-proclaimed Leap Year Capital of the World. They hold a four-day leap year festival each leap year that includes a huge birthday party for all leap year babies.

Famous Leapers

If you were born on leap day, you share a birthday with composer Gioacchino Rossini, motivational speaker Tony Robbins, jazz musician Jimmy Dorsey, actors Dennis Farina and Antonio Sabato Jr., and rapper/actor Ja Rule.

There’s a Leap year club

The Honor Society of Leap Year Babies is a club for people born on Feb. 29. More than 10,000 people worldwide are members.

Leap Year The Movie

Amy Adams and Matthew Goode starred in the 2010 romcom “Leap Year.”
It’s about a woman who travels to Ireland to ask her boyfriend to accept her wedding proposal on leap day, when tradition says that men cannot refuse a woman’s marriage proposal.

Leap Years in History

During leap years, George Armstrong Custer fought the Battle of the Little Bighorn (1876), the Titanic sank (1912), Benjamin Franklin proved that lightning is electricity (1752) and gold was discovered in California (1848).

Well, now we know a little bit about leap year, why we have it, and where it came from. So, if you’re turning 40 this year the staff here at The Storage Inn would like to wish you a Happy 10th Birthday!

Yummy Winter Comfort Foods

Favorite Winter Foods - The Storage Inn Blog

It’s late January here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and there have been some very cold days lately, but that doesn’t stop our storage rental customers from shuttling in and out of their storage spaces.

Lately I’ve noticed people storing holiday decorations, as well as removing exercise equipment, presumably in an effort to renew their commitment to better health in the new year.

Earlier this week, on a particularly cold day, one of our customers, Jodi, stopped into the storage rental office to purchase  moving boxes for the items that she was putting into her storage unit.

“Cold enough for you?” I asked.

“I’m freezing” she answered  “I can’t wait to get home and have a nice bowl of hot soup!” she said as she took her boxes and headed to her car.

Her soup sounded really good to me, so I decided to do a thoroughly unscientific polling of our customers as to their favorite winter comfort foods.

Here some of our Storage Inn customer favorites!

Soup – Of course! Who doesn’t love a hot bowl of soup on a cold winter’s day?  The two favorites seem to be chicken noodle, and tomato.

Chicken Soup

Favorite Winter Comfort Foods

Hot Chocolate – Mmmmmm. The real chocolaty kind with the tiny little marshmallows floating on top!  Not surprisingly, this one was offered up by one of our customer’s children.

Fried Chicken and Mashed Potatoes – Yes, please! – Make my chicken extra crispy!

Grilled Cheese – Cooked just right, so that the gooey cheese stretches  between the two halves when you pull the sandwich apart!  These people should get together with the soup people.

Sloppy Joes – Well, a burger is just a burger, but a sloppy joe, with a slice of American cheese – Now that’s comfort food!

Macaroni and Cheese – The cheesier the better – BTW goes well with sloppy joes!

Chicken Pot Pie – One of my favorites! I like mine with salt and pepper and a little bit of butter melted on the crust. Mmmmmm!

Spaghetti and Meatballs – A good choice any time of year, but really goes well at the end of a cold day spent outside.

Chili – There’s nothing like a simmering pot of chili. Whether you like it hot or mild, with meat or without, the combination of beans, onions, peppers, mushrooms and spices are impossible to resist when you’re cozy at home and it’s chilly outside.

Homemade Beef Stew  – You know the type that simmers in the giant stew pot all day long, until the flavors of the beef, vegetables, and spices are mixed just right. Don’t forget the buttered rolls!

Well, there you have it – The official Storage Inn customer list of their favorite Winter Comfort Foods.

Well, my shift is almost over, and I can’t wait to head home, but first I’ll be stopping off at the grocery store for Sloppy Joe mix, rolls, and hot chocolate – so much for my New Year’s diet!

 

The “Fa La La La La” on Christmas Songs

The holiday season is in full swing here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey! Our storage rental customers are busy buying packing and shipping supplies, and retrieving the gifts they stowed away in their storage units.

Like many retail locations at this time of year, our storage rental office is filled with holiday songs wafting through the air. Hearing non-stop Christmas music on the radio made me wonder, where did these songs come from, who wrote them, and how long have they been around?

Here are a few fun facts about some of our holiday favorites… 

While we associate “Jingle Bells” with Christmas, the song was originally written to celebrate Thanksgiving.

The first Christmas song to mention Santa Claus was Benjamin Hanby’s “Up On The Housetop.” Written in 1864, Hanby was inspired by Clement Moore’s 1823 poem “A Visit from Saint Nicholas.” (The night before Christmas)

Thurl Ravenscroft, the singer responsible for classic song “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch”, also voiced Tony the Tiger, the mascot for Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes.

“White Christmas” was written by Jewish songwriter Irving Berlin.

Irving Berlin hated Elvis Presley’s version of “White Christmas” so much that he tried to prevent radio stations from playing Presley’s cover.

The American military played “White Christmas” over Armed Forces Radio as a covert signal instructing soldiers in Vietnam to evacuate Saigon.

Bing Crosby’s version of “White Christmas” is the highest-selling single of all time.

In 1906, a violin solo of “O Holy Night” was the second piece of music to be broadcast on radio.

“Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” and “Joy to the World” are two of the oldest English language Christmas hymns, originating in the 1700s.

 “Let It Snow” is considered a Christmas song despite the fact that it never once mentions the holiday and was written by Jewish songwriters Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn.

 “Jingle Bells” was the first song performed in space.

Songwriter Gloria Shayne Baker wrote “Do You Hear What I Hear?” as a plea for peace during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

Jay Livingston and Ray Evans’ holiday classic “Silver Bells” was originally titled “Tinkle Bells.” They changed it when Livingston’s wife explained that “tinkle” was often a synonym for urination.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer was created by Robert L. May, a staff copywriter for the Montgomery Ward department store as part of a series of holiday-themed coloring books sold by the retail giant.

“We Wish You A Merry Christmas” is one of the oldest secular Christmas songs, originating in 16th century England.

Mel Tormé’s “The Christmas Song” (more commonly known as “Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire”) was written during a summer heatwave in 1944.

Darlene Love sang her holiday hit “Christmas Baby Please Come Home” on David Letterman’s late-night show every year for 28 years.

Singer Brenda Lee recorded the original version of “Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree” when she was only 13 years old.

These are just a few of the hundreds and hundreds of holiday tunes that we hear each and every year. It would be impossible to chronicle each and every one here, but I will give you a clue as to my favorite – it involves barking dogs. Merry Christmas everyone!

Cool Facts about Thanksgiving

It’s a beautiful fall day here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, and Thanksgiving is this week! Ahhh, Thanksgiving – a day for family visits, football, and overeating! I conducted a random poll of our self storage customers regarding Thanksgiving and found that while everyone seems to like the food, mostly the men like football, and everyone seems to have mixed emotions about the family visits. As one of our long time storage unit renters, Jim put it, “I love to see my relatives for Thanksgiving, then I love to see them leave!” 

As a service to our readers, the staff here at The Storage Inn has rounded up a few very cool facts about Thanksgiving, some of which might come in handy during those awkward silences at the family dinner table. 

Thomas Jefferson Nixes Thanksgiving!

George Washington was the first to declare Thanksgiving a holiday, but it was on a year-to-year basis, so presidents had to re-declare it every year. Jefferson refused to declare it a holiday during his presidency because he fervently believed in the separation of church and state and thought that the day of “prayer” violated the First Amendment. 

It wasn’t until 1863, when Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a federal holiday, that it was officially scheduled to fall on the fourth Thursday of every November. 

It’s a zoo out there!

The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York took place in 1914, when Macy’s employees dressed in vibrant costumes and marched to the flagship store on 34th Street. The parade used floats instead of balloons, and it featured monkeys, bears, camels, and elephants, all borrowed from the Central Park Zoo.

The parade was also originally called the Macy’s Christmas Parade but was renamed the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1927. Macy’s originally hoped their “Christmas parade” would get their shoppers ready for big holiday shopping sprees. 

Turkeytown U.S.A.

Three small towns in America are named after the nation’s favorite bird. The towns are Turkey, Texas; Turkey, North Carolina; and Turkey Creek, Louisiana. There are also two townships in Pennsylvania called Upper Turkeyfoot and Lower Turkeyfoot.

“Jingle Bells” was originally a Thanksgiving song

James Pierpoint composed the song in 1857 for children celebrating Thanksgiving. The title was “One Horse Open Sleigh,” and it was such a hit that it was sung again at Christmas.

The song quickly became associated with the Christmas holiday season, and the title was officially changed in 1859, two years later.

Ben Franklin – Turkey Lover

Benjamin Franklin thought Eagles were “a bird of bad moral character.”
Franklin thought the Turkey was a “much more respectable bird.”

The Detroit Lions always play on Thanksgiving

The first NFL football game that took place on Thanksgiving Day was in 1934, when the Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears. The Lions have played on Thanksgiving ever since, except when the team was called away to serve during World War II. The Dallas Cowboys also always play on Thanksgiving. Their first Thanksgiving Day game was held in 1966, and the Cowboys have only missed two games since then. 

The night before Thanksgiving is Party Time!

The Wednesday before Thanksgiving is the best day for bar sales in America. It makes sense, since nearly all Americans have Thanksgiving off, and dealing with family members can be very stressful. (But at least stuffing your face with fatty Thanksgiving foods is a perfect hangover cure.)

Thanksgiving by “Hungry Man”

In 1953 Swanson Foods overestimated the demand for turkey by over 260 tons. The owners of the company had no idea what to do with all the leftovers, so they ordered 5,000 aluminum trays and loaded them with the turkey leftovers to create the first TV dinner. 

“Franksgiving” Flops

In 1939, Franklin Roosevelt changed the date of Thanksgiving from the last Thursday in November to the second-to-last in an attempt to lift the economy during the Great Depression, by giving people more time to shop for Christmas. It caused such a public outcry that people began referring to it as “Franksgiving.” After two years, Congress ditched the new policy and set the fourth Thursday of November as the legal holiday. 

Minnesota – The Turkey State!

Minnesota produces more turkeys than any other state in America. The state produced about 44.5 million birds last year, North Carolina, Arkansas, Indiana, and Missouri are also top producers.

A Turkey Saved….

The White House has a tradition of pardoning one lucky turkey each year. The annual tradition began in 1947 with President Harry Truman although some think that it actually started in the 1860’s with Abraham Lincoln, after his son Tad begged him to spare his pet turkey’s life.

Despite these two theories of the origins of the pardon, George H. W. Bush was the first president to officially grant a turkey a presidential pardon, according to The New York Times. 

Okay – now that you have some cool Thanksgiving facts, courtesy of The Storage Inn, you are ready to face your relatives on Thanksgiving! Feel free to pepper these unique facts throughout the dinner conversation, and give yourself a presidential pardon allowing you to have a second slice of pumpkin pie – Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 

Lederhosen, Beer and Oktoberfest

Lederhosen, Beer and Oktoberfest

Fall is in full swing here at The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and this self storage rental facility is jumping with customers shuttling in and out of their storage units, most of them pulling out their cold weather clothing and fall items such as Halloween decorations.

There’s always something interesting going on here, but yesterday I witnessed a sight that I never expected to see.

I recognized the truck that pulled into our storage unit rental office parking lot. It was one of our good customers, Jason, the wrestling coach of the local high school. What I didn’t expect was to see Jason hop out of his truck and stroll into the office, dressed head-to-toe in German Lederhosen!

“You’re a little early for Halloween, aren’t you?” I said as he walked through the door.

“Not Halloween – Oktoberfest!” he replied.

Jason and his wife were on their way to an Oktoberfest celebration. They even had special beer mugs that they had retrieved from their storage unit for the occasion. Jason grabbed a roll of packing tape and some bubble wrap, and then took off to Oktoberfest.

This got me thinking not only about Oktoberfest, but more importantly, about beer!  Where did beer come from, and why do so many people around the world love it so much?

I decided to do some research and here is what I found…

Drink Like an Egyptian

Beer has a long history, one that’s longer than we’ll ever be able to trace. Residue of the first known beer was found in a jar at an excavation site in modern day Iran, presumably sitting there since someone took his or her last sip around 3400 B.C. But chances are, the first beer had been “cracked” long before that.

So while an exact date or time for the first chug, or keg stand, or even hiccup, is not known, what is known is that beer, like bread, developed best in farm-based societies where there was an enough grain and time for fermentation. One thing we definitely know is that ancient man loved beer as much as—if not more—than we do. The Babylonians had about 20 recipes for beer, Egyptian Pharaohs were buried with vats of the stuff, even the workers who built the pyramids were essentially paid in beer.

One of the first written recipes for beer actually comes from a 3800 year-old poem that celebrates the Sumerian goddess of beer and also conveniently outlines steps for brewing.

However it began, beer rapidly took hold as one of civilization’s favorite, and safest ways to drink. Historically speaking, water wasn’t always safe to drink, and alcoholic drinks like beer, which were sanitized by the application of heat, were actually safer to consume. The appearance of beer also changed as brewing methods evolved. Babylonians drank their beer with a straw because it was thicker and full of grain! 

Germany “Hops” On Board

For centuries, beer cultivation in Europe relied on a mixture of herbs and spices called gruit. Only around the turn of the first millennium A.D. were hops regularly finding their way to beer, with Germany exporting hops for brewing around the 13th century.

By the 16th Century,Germany’s “Reinheitsgebot” beer purity law had essentially removed everything but water, hops, and barley from acceptable brewing ingredients (yeast, a slight oversight, was added back to the list a few centuries later).

Over the centuries, beer’s popularity has remained constant. The Prohibition era introduced our palates to a lighter flavor profile that lingers to this day, especially among mass-marketed beers. On the other hand, craft beer has made serious gains in the market, yielding a historically unprecedented diversity of styles. One company and even brewed a beer using the ancient poem’s recipe, and Dogfish Head’s Ancient Ales line includes beers like the “Ta Henket – a version of Egyptian bread beer. 

So, now that you are armed with some serious beer history knowledge, courtesy of The Storage Inn, you can pull on your Lederhosen, grab your beer stein, and head for your local Oktoberfest celebration. Have fun, but take it easy on the Bratwurst – Auf Wiedersehen!

September is a Sweet Time of Year!

Honey — it’s a sweet and delicious substance that adds great flavor to morning toast, creates decadent desserts, and even packs some serious nutritional benefits.

Here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, we even keep honey on hand for sweetening our morning coffee!

The other day, just as I finished opening the storage rental office, in walked one of our storage customers, Mrs. Xander. She needed to purchase packing supplies before making her way back to her storage unit.

“ Are you celebrating?” she asked.”

Celebrating what?” I replied.

“Well, I saw that you put honey in your coffee, and thought that maybe you were celebrating National Honey Month.  My friend is a beekeeper and he has been telling me all about honey and it’s history!”

“I did not know September is National Honey Month.” I replied. We chatted about honey for a little while before she headed back to her storage unit.

I sat down to my desk and began to think about how much I love honey, and how little I know about what it takes to make it. Where did the idea of honey as a food even come from? I started my research…

A Concise History of Honey

2400 BC
Ancient Egyptians leave hieroglyphs about beekeeping in an ancient Sun Temple near Cairo.

2000 BC
The Ancient Chinese used honey because of its spectacular medicinal properties.

1000 AD
Honey was used as a form of currency in places throughout Europe.

1638
European settlers introduced beekeeping to the New England colonies.

1926
A.A. Milne created the lovable honey-loving bear, Winnie the Pooh.

How to Celebrate!

Take a beekeeping tour
You’ll get up close to beehives and find out what an effort it takes to make a jar of honey. 

Host a honey tasting party
Gather up a few different high quality jars of honey, invite a few friends over, and indulge your sweet tooth.

Whip up a honey-themed dessert
Baklava, flan, cupcakes, and ice cream. All of these sweet treats lend themselves to becoming delicious honey-flavored desserts. There are a ton of excellent recipes out there for honey desserts, so the possibilities are endless.

5 Sweet Facts About Honey

Bees try harder
The average worker bee only produces about one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey throughout its entire lifetime.

That’s a lot of flowers
For every pound of honey, honeybees must tap over two million flowers.

Insect chefs
Bees are the only insects that produce a substance that is edible by humans.

Honey isn’t just for bees
Mexican honey wasps are also known for producing honey.

Not Created equally
There are different variations of honey. Depending on the type of flower used during production, honey will have different colors and flavors.

Why We Love Honey

Honey is a health aid
Dating back to ancient times, honey has been used for its medicinalpurposes. The next time you have a cough, try reaching for a jar of honey. Honey is even known to help heal wounds and relieve dry skin.

It’s Naturally Sweet
Honey is excellent for curing almost any sweet tooth. Unlike some highly processed sugars and sugar-like substances out there, honey is chemical free and found directly in nature.

Honey Helps You Sleep
In short, honey causes insulin levels to rise, and when this happens, serotonin gets released throughout the bloodstream. Serotonin gets converted into melatonin, and melatonin has been known to aid in getting you off to dreamland.

Wow! Who knew that something that tastes so good could also be so healthy!?! 

As for me, I will continue to put honey in my morning coffee, strictly for health purposes, of course. Happy Honey Month from the crew here at The Storage Inn!

 

Back to School Around the World

Back to School Around the World!

September and back to school is upon us! Here at The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township, teachers and students are busy retrieving items from their storage units in preparation for the new school year. This week I saw Mrs. Oglesby, loading boxes of art supplies for her classroom. And local college students are in and out picking up stored furniture for their dorm.

Who knew that school and self-storage went together so well?!?

All of this school centered activity made me wonder what back to school is like throughout the rest of the world. Here’s a look at what students in several different countries are doing to prepare for a new year of learning!

First Day of School in Japan

In Japan, children carry all of their school supplies in a hard-sided backpack called a randoseru. It’s filled with books, origami paper and a special pencil case called a fudebako. For students who bring their own lunch to school, the tradition is to bring a lunch of rice with seaweed sauce and quail eggs. This meal is thought to bring good luck. Also, since outdoor shoes are not permitted inside the school, students bring a pair of slippers.

First Day of School in Holland

In Holland, cargo bikes called bakfietsen, are frequently used by parents to take their kids to school.  These bikes have a large box that sits in front of the rider. Bakfietsen owners love that they are eco-friendly and don’’t require a parking spot. The bikes are so popular with parents that nearly all bakfietsen are used to tote around the kids! On the first day back, students are sure to be rolling up to school in one of these smart inventions.

First Day of School in Germany

For over 200 years now, kids in Germany have been given a Schultuete (pronounced shool-too-teh) on the first day of school. A Schultuete, which translates to “school cone,” is a large, decorated paper cone filled with school supplies, small presents and sweet things to eat. Sometimes they’re nearly as large as the child!

First Day of School in Russia

To celebrate the beginning of a brand new year of learning, the first day of school in Russia is called the “Day of Knowledge.” On this day, children traditionally give colorful bouquets of fresh flowers to their teachers and receive balloons in return.

First day of School in India

In India, kids also get special gifts on the first day of school, or Praveshanotshavan.  The first day of school also known as Admission Day, coincides with the beginning of monsoon season, and the gifts often include a brand new umbrella.

So there you have it – you learned something new and didn’t even have to go back to school to do it! Happy Back to School!

 

Beat the Heat: Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

The Storage Inn Blog About Staying Hydrated for Storage Rental Customers

Beat the Heat: Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

Always consult your doctor for the best medical advice. 

It’s mid-July here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and although we are in the midst of a heatwave, our storage facility is as busy as ever, with storage customers out and about, occasionally stopping into the rental office for a complimentary bottle of cold spring water!

Today, one of our most senior customers, Beatrice (age 87), stopped in for a bottle of water on her way back to her storage unit.

“ Hello Beatrice – Hot one today !”, I proclaimed as I handed her a bottle of ice cold water.

“Sure is – you know it’s hot when the temperature is higher than my age!” she quipped.

We had the usual conversation about the heat, and how we would be complaining about the cold soon enough. Beatrice smiled and waved goodbye as she headed to her car. This made me think… How would I handle the heat at age 87?

Here are some helpful hot weather tips for seniors!

Stay hydrated
Elderly individuals have a harder time knowing when they are dehydrated, so, they are more prone to heat stroke.Seniors also lose the ability to conserve water as they age. Avoid drinks containing caffeine and alcohol, as they will further dehydrate you. 

Dress appropriately
Loose-fitting and light-colored clothes will keep you cool and not absorb as much heat from the sun. It’s best to wear breathable fabrics, such as cotton, to help regulate your temperature.  A broad hat and sunglasses will keep the sun’s rays out of your face and eyes.

Wear sunscreen
This is especially pertinent for seniors, as many prescription medications make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Applying a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher will help you avoid sunburn.

Stay out of the sun
Check the forecast and avoid prolonged time in the sun, especially on days where the temperature reaches above 90 degrees. Try to plan any outside activities for the early morning or in twilight hours after the sun sets.

Spend time in air-conditioned places
If you want to get out of the house while avoiding the heat (or if your house isn’t air-conditioned), look for activities in spots with AC. Go see a movie with the grandkids, or read a book at the library. A walk around the mall or a class at your local senior center are great ways to get exercise indoors.

Know when to cool down
If you’re feeling heated, take a tepid (not too hot or cold) bath or shower to cool down. You can also use cool washcloths on the neck, wrist, and armpits. Seniors are at a higher risk of heat-related illnesses. Poor circulation, heart disease, high blood pressure, and the inability to perspire due to certain medications present further complications.

HEAT RELATED WARNING SIGNS 

Health Problem Definition Warning Signs
Dehydration A loss of water in the body Weakness, headache, muscle cramps, dizziness, confusion, passing out
Heat Stroke Dangerous rise in body temperature Temperature of 103 or higher; red, hot, dry skin; fast pulse; headache; dizziness; nausea or vomiting; confusion; passing out
Heat Exhaustion Caused by too much heat and dehydration and may lead to heat stroke Heavy sweating or no sweating, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, paleness, cold or clammy skin, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, fast and weak pulse, fainting
Heat Syncope Fainting caused by high temperatures Dizziness or fainting

In summary, seniors should protect themselves from the summer heat by staying hydrated, staying cool, and, if you must go outside – dress appropriately and wear sunscreen!

Thanks for taking the time to read this post! The staff here at The Storage Inn will continue to do our part by offering our storage customers free cold spring water, and a chance to cool off in our complimentary, air-conditioned tenant office area. Happy Heatwave everyone – stay safe!

 

We’re Singin’ the Blues – Berries That Is!

Blueberry Month at The Storage Inn

We’re Singin’ the Blues – Berries that is!

It’s July here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we are as busy as ever renting extra space for storage, moving trucks and moving vans, and helping people with storage packing supplies!

July also happens to be National blueberry month – how do I know this? We happen to be located just minutes from the blueberry capital of the world, Hammonton New Jersey.

Blueberries by the Numbers

New Jersey’s $79.5 million blueberry industry includes about 254 farms and around 8,800 acres, with about 7,594 of those acres located in Hammonton. 49 million pounds of blueberries per year are harvested in the Hammonton, NJ area. If you’re in New Jersey and looking for fresh blueberries, chances are you’ll end up in Hammonton.

Here are some benefits of our delicious local blueberries…

Blueberries are great for your bones

They’re tiny, but blueberries contain seven vitamins! Iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and vitamin K.  While iron and zinc help to maintain the elasticity of bones and joints, vitamin K has been shown to prevent bone fractures over time.

They help with weight loss & digestion

Blueberries have a surprisingly high fiber content. In fact, adding one cup of fresh blueberries can add up to 4.2 grams of fiber to your diet with only 80 calories!  Getting enough fiber not only helps with regulating digestion and maintaining a healthy digestive tract, but it also helps you feel full and satisfied for longer which can help support a healthy weight and lifestyle.

 

Blueberries support your skin’s health

Your skin’s support system, collagen, relies on vitamin C to help prevent damage.  This damage comes from many things including air pollution and cigarette smoke. The vitamin C found in blueberries can help assist collagen in smoothing out wrinkles and improving overall skin texture so that your skin looks and feels healthy!

Blueberries are packed with antioxidants

Antioxidants are important. They help protect your cells against free radicals! In case you’ve never heard of them, they’re molecules produced when your body breaks down food or is exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation.  They can start a chain of harmful chemical reactions that hurt the cells in your body. Not to worry though, blueberries are actually believed to be the highest antioxidant-containing food of all commonly eaten fruits!

Blueberry boosts your brain

As we age, our memory tends to decline and conditions such as Alzheimer’s and dementia become more common.  In recent studies, however, blueberries have been found to boost cognitive function and reduce the likelihood of these diseases.  We can thank the dense concentration of flavonoids, a group of plant chemicals that give fruits and vegetables their vibrant colors.  This chemical has been shown to increase brain activity and blood flow to the brain which makes it a powerful weapon in the fight to treat Alzheimer’s.

Thanks for taking the time to read a few good reasons to enjoy our delicious local blueberries courtesy of The Storage Inn. I think I’ll stop on my way through Hammonton today and grab a couple pints! 

Happy Blueberry Month!

Storage Inn Camping Blog Post

June is National Camping Month!

The weather is beautiful and storage rental units are selling like hotcakes here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey!

As I was making my storage facility rounds, I noticed our resident scoutmaster Bob, pulling out camping supplies from the local Boy Scout Troop’s storage space. “That time of year” I shouted.  “Yep – National Camping Month!” Bob shot back.

This encounter got me wondering… is camping still just as popular these days as it was when I was a Boy Scout? 

Here’s what I discovered in my research! There are over 13,000 vehicle accessible campgrounds  in the USA and Canada.

Approximately 40 million people go camping per year in the USA!

The average campground stay is 2.7 nights.

Tents are still the most popular way to camp accounting for 69% of total campers.

More than 355,000 travel trailers, motor homes, and folding camping trailers are being sold each year in the U.S.

The number one activity enjoyed by campers is swimming.

The most expensive campground in the world is Clayoquot Wilderness Resort in Vancouver Island, Canada. A  single night costs $3,900.

According to the most recent American Camping Report, a whopping 99% of camping participants said they were likely or very likely to camp the following year.

Camping can relieve stress and depression. When you raise your levels of oxygen, serotonin, and melatonin — which happens when you partake in outdoor physical activities — your stress levels will automatically decrease.

Camping is obviously still a huge family pastime – I know that I enjoyed it growing up.  So get out there campers! And, if you need a spot to store your camping gear, be sure to come see us at The Storage Inn.  One last tip from an ex Boy Scout and seasoned camper – Don’t forget the bug spray – Happy Camping!