Monthly Archives: April 2019

The Season for Sneezin’ and Wheezin’

Spring has sprung here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and the storage facility has been buzzing like a beehive. Our storage tenants are shuttling to and from their rental spaces like there’s no tomorrow! Time to open the office window and get some fresh….ah,ah,ah,CHOO – Allergies!  Yes, ’tis the Season for Pollen and Sneezin’ !

Just yesterday, one of our long-time customers, Lois, walked into our storage rental office to rent a moving van, wearing a surgical mask.

”You sick?” I asked.

“No – allergies” she replied.

I asked her what  type of medication she was taking for her allergies.

”No doctors for me – I’m all natural” .

Turns out Lois takes a combination of bee pollen and something called Nettle Leaf to relieve her symptoms. Lois completed her storage unit rental and drove off.

That got me wondering about what other natural treatments might be available to all of us allergy sufferers.

I did some research…

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is an amazing natural allergy remedy, as it can help reduce mucus production and cleanse your lymphatic system. The quick and dirty approach is to swallow a tablespoon. For a more palatable option, try adding a tablespoon to a cup of hot water with a small bit of honey.

Local Honey

Allergy symptoms are your body’s reaction to a substance it deems hazardous to your health.

Unfortunately, you can’t simply tell your body that grass and pollen aren’t bad for it. But you can help your body learn that the local habitat isn’t deadly by giving your body small doses of the grass and pollen that are irritating it.

Local honey contains trace amounts of the very pollen that could be making you feel sick. It can help naturally reduce your allergy symptoms over time. Start administering it to immediately begin seeing results.

Bee Pollen

Like honey, bee pollen contains the natural substances of the bee hive locale. It offers an alternative way to introduce these substances into your immune system. It tastes great sprinkled on fruit or tossed in salad and offers a bit of a sweet crunch. Google your local farmer’s market or search for “local honey farmers” to find products close to your home.

Exercise

The last thing you probably want to do when you feel crummy is workout, but researchers have found that moderate to intense activity for just 30 minutes can result in substantial allergy relief. Relief occurs because exercise produces an anti-inflammatory effect in your nasal passages, helping to naturally reduce allergy symptoms.

Typically, an indoor workout will most likely be more beneficial as it will reduce re-exposure.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture treats a wide variety of health issues, including depression, digestive issues, general pain, muscle weakness, and immune deficiency. 

Nettle Leaf

Nettle leaf can help naturally block your body’s ability to produce histamine, which can provide allergy relief naturally. You can get it in capsules or buy the leaf whole, which is my preference. Steep it with peppermint leaves and a small amount of honey to create an herbal tea that will be tasty and beneficial.

Water

Hydrate like it’s your job. That sounds simple, right? You’d be surprised how many people are dehydrated! Being dehydrated can make you tired and make it difficult for you to get a full night’s rest. It can cause headaches, breakouts, and bloating. And, it can heighten any allergy symptoms you’re experiencing. The more water you can drink, the better you’re going to feel.

So, there you have it – some tips to help you manage your allergy symptoms this spring,  courtesy of The Storage Inn. As for me, it’s time to head home, and curl up on the couch, with a nice apple cider vinegar, honey, and Nettle Leaf cocktail – Cheers!

 

Motorcycle Self Storage Tips for Spring!
Time to Ride!

April is on and there are plenty of motorcycles cruising past our office at The Storage Inn Self Storage facility here in Egg Harbor Township in South Jersey. I’ve also noticed a few of our storage space customers getting their bikes out and who could blame them on a days like these?

As I was making my rounds, I ran into one of our long time motorcycle storage customers, Chuck, who had his storage unit door open. He appeared to be staring intently at the inner workings of his Harley Road King.

“Headed out?” I yelled to him.

“ Not until I do my Spring safety check “  he shouted back at me.

Upon closer investigation, I found that Chuck had a paper checklist that he follows every spring. Being a rider myself, I was curious to see what his list included.

Here is Chuck’s checklist…

  1. Check your battery – This the heart of your ride’s electrical system. Chuck says that any biker worth his salt will have already been connected to a trickle charger, and should be good to go, but if you don’t have your battery on a charger, the first thing to make your motorcycle ride-ready is to charge your battery.
  2. Change the oil & filter – It’s best to change your bike’s oil before you store it for the winter, but if not, now’s the time to do it. Swap that stale lubricant out for fresh clean oil and a new filter. If you don’t do the work on your bike, make arrangements with your favorite cycle shop to get it done.
  3. Kick the Tires : We don’t really want you to kick them, but you should do a full 360 degree check on each tire for any cracking or punctures. Also, check for wear. On many tires, tread wear indicator bars signal a need for replacement. But there also the old trick of using a penny. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head  when facing down and inserted into the tire tread… it’s time for a new tire. If your tires pass the wear test, inflate them to the manufacturer’s inflation specs and your rubber is ready to go!
  4. Fuel up  – Ideally, you should have stabilized the fuel in your motorcycle during the winterizing process before you placed it into storage. If you didn’t winterize, and also didn’t fill the tank before storing, check the fuel tank for rust, which may have formed due to water condensation. If the tank is clean, fill it and ‘ride-on’. If there are signs of rust, you’ll live with the consequences – fouled carburetor, clogged fuel filter, etc. – until you replace the tank.
  5. Check your Connections – A Spring tune up of cables, plugs, and pivot points is time well spent. Check all electrical connections, cables, and all moving parts that might require lubrication. Things tend to dry out over the winter, so take the time to make sure that the moving parts are kept moving!

    Mature man,working on motorcycle in garage

  6. Lights! Camera! Action! Turn on your motorcycle’s power and check all the lights for any that have inoperative bulbs and replace them. (i.e.  brake lights, turn signals, headlights, etc.) Often, replacement bulbs come in twos, so save extras for the next time you need one. If a new bulb does not light, it’s time to check the fuse box. If that doesn’t work, it’s time to visit your local cycle shop. Electrical problems are best left to the experts.
  7. Ready, Set, Stop! Stopping your motorcycle safely is just as important as ensuring your bike can accelerate. Before you hit the road, thoroughly check all the components of your brake system – lever adjustment, cables, calipers, brake pads, etc. If things don’t seem right and you’re not comfortable making adjustments, seek professional help. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.
  8. Stay Hydrated – Check all of the motorcycle’s fluid levels – brake, clutch, oil, coolant. Top them off as needed. Look for any leaks on the floor where your motorcycle’s been stored. Another way to check for leaks is to start and warm your bike to running temperature, then turn it off and check for leaks.
  9. Keep it Clean – The old adage, “Cleanliness is next to Godliness” is true – especially for your motorcycle. When you’ve taken all the steps to prepare your motorcycle mechanically, thoroughly clean the exterior. Your bike will look as good as it runs and you’ll look good riding it!!!
  10. Ride safe! Always watch out for other drivers! 

So there you have it. Chuck’s checklist. Get ready, get that bike out of storage, and get riding!