June is National Flag Month!

June is National Flag Month –  Sandwiched between Memorial Day and the 4th of July holiday, is a full month celebrating our American flag and June 14th is officially Flag Day!  We here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township NJ fully embracing the red, white and blue! We proudly fly The Stars and Stripes over our rental office, employ numerous veterans, and offer storage space discounts to our men and women in uniform.

In keeping with the spirit of national flag month, The Storage Inn would like to share the rules for the display and handling of the American flag.

Traditional guidelines call for displaying the flag in public only from sunrise to sunset, however, the flag may be displayed at night if it’s illuminated.. The flag should not be displayed during rain, snow and wind storms unless it is an all-weather flag. It should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously.

When carried in procession with other flags the U.S. flag should be front and center of the flag line. When displayed on a float in a parade, the flag should be suspended so it falls free. It should not be draped over a vehicle.

When displayed with another flag with crossed staffs, the U.S. flag should be on its own right (left to a person facing the wall) and its staff should be in front of the other flag’s staff. In a group of flags, the U.S. flag should be at the center and the highest point.

When the U.S. flag is displayed projecting from a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak unless the flag is at half-staff.

When flags of states, cities or organizations are flown on the same staff, the U.S. flag must be at the top 

The flag should never be draped or drawn back in folds. Draped red, white and blue bunting should be used for decoration, with the blue at the top and red at the bottom.

The flag may be flown at half-staff by order of the president or the governor only.

On Memorial Day, the flag should be displayed at half-staff until noon.

 

Things Not to Do with the Flag

Dip it for any person or thing, even though state flags, regimental colors and other flags may be dipped as a mark of honor.

Display it with the union down, except as a signal of distress

Let the flag touch anything beneath it: ground, floor, water, etc.

Carry it horizontally, but always aloft.

Fasten or display it in a way that will permit it to be damaged or soiled.

Place anything on the flag, including letters, insignia, or designs of any kind.

Use it for holding anything.

Use it as wearing apparel, bedding or drapery. It should not be used on a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be attached to the uniform of patriotic organizations, military personnel, police officers and firefighters.

Use the flag for advertising or promotion purposes or print it on paper napkins, boxes or anything else intended for temporary use.

During the hoisting or lowering of the flag or when it passes in parade or review, Americans should stand at attention facing the flag and place their right hand over their heart. Uniformed military members render the military salute. Men not in uniform should remove any headdress and hold it with their right hand at their left shoulder, their hand resting over the heart. Those who are not U.S. citizens should stand at attention. When the flag is worn out or otherwise no longer a fitting emblem for display, it should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

So there you have it – A little flag etiquette courtesy of The Storage Inn to help you enjoy all of our patriotic holidays.  Have a great Summer and God Bless America!

 

Remember to thank Veterans all year long

How Memorial Day Came To Be

Memorial Day weekend is finally upon us, and the yard is buzzing here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. People are visiting their storage units, retrieving their barbecue grills and beach chairs in preparation for the big weekend. As I watch the busy storage yard activity, it occurs to me that many of our tenants and quite a few of our employees are veterans.

As a tribute, here are a few Memorial Day facts that you might not have known, courtesy of The Storage Inn.

The observance, which began in the years following the Civil War, was originally known as Decoration Day. By the late 1860s, many Americans had begun hosting tributes to the war’s fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers and flags. It gradually came to be known as Memorial Day over the years.

It was Union General John A. Logan who called for an official nationwide day of remembrance on May 30, 1868, a date chosen because it was not the anniversary of any particular battle. However, the southern states originally observed a different day to honor the Confederate soldiers who died in the Civil War. Eventually the holiday evolved to commemorate fallen military personnel in all wars. There are still 11 states that observe an official day to honor those who lost their lives fighting for the Confederacy—Virginia is the only one that observes Confederate Memorial Day on the same day as Memorial Day.

In 1950, Congress passed a resolution requesting that the President issue a proclamation calling on Americans to observe Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace.

In 1968, Congress established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May, in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees. But Memorial Day didn’t actually become an official federal holiday until 1971.

In 2000, President Bill Clinton signed the National Moment of Remembrance Act, which asks Americans to observe a Moment of Silence at 3:00 p.m. on Memorial Day..

Some of the largest Memorial Day parades take place in Chicago, New York, and, of course, Washington D.C. which boasts an audience exceeding 250,000, who watch as marching bands, active duty and retired military units, youth groups, veterans, and floats head down Constitution Avenue.

On Memorial Day, the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico direct the flag to be flown at half-staff until noon on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels.

U.S. citizens are asked to display the flag at half-staff from their homes before noon, as well.

So, while you’re having a great time with family and friends this weekend, do take a moment to remember those who gave their lives, to preserve our American way of life.  Have a great Memorial Day weekend, and God Bless America!

 

May was made for Grillin’ and Chillin’

It’s May here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and our storage customers are very busy retrieving spring items from their rental units. Lawn chairs, bicycles, and barbecue grills seem to be the most popular items. While Spring can be a mixed bag of temperatures, the change to warmer weather does seem to inspire people to fire up the grill. Just today I noticed two of our self storage customers, Jim and Sally, retrieving not one, but two grills from their storage unit. “You must be really hungry!” I yelled to them. “ Well, it is National BBQ month!” Jim yelled back to me.

It turns out that May is National Barbecue Month, and while most in the United States recognize Memorial Day Weekend as the official start of barbecue season, May is the month when most Americans take to their backyards to fire up their grills and smokers for delicious weeknight dinners and slow & low weekend feasts.

Here are our top 10 – Storage Inn – Barbeque Fun Facts to enjoy as you throw those burgers on the grill this year:


1 – 75% of U.S. adults own a grill or smoker.

2 – 62% of households that own a grill own a gas grill, followed by charcoal (53%), and electric (12%). Two percent own a wood pellet grill and 8% are thinking of purchasing one this year.

3 – The most popular days to barbecue are: Fourth of July (76%), Labor Day (62%), Memorial Day (62%), Father’s Day (49%), Mother’s Day (34%).

4 – The top reasons for cooking out? 71% of grill owners say it’s to improve flavor, 54% for personal enjoyment, and 42% for entertaining family and friends.

5 – The majority of grill owners (63%) enjoy using their grill or smoker year-round. In fact, 43% cook at least once a month in the winter months.

6 – Half of all grill owners have the most basic grilling accessories (cleaning brush, tongs, glove/mitts). The most popular new accessories that owners plan to buy include pizza stones, baskets, and cooking planks.

7 – Ten percent of all grill owners have a backyard kitchen (featuring premium furniture and lighting).


8 – Barbecuing isn’t just an evening activity. 11% of grill owners prepared breakfast on a grill in the past year.

9 – Nearly one third of grill owners (31%) grilled someplace other than their homes in the past year, including 24% who grilled while camping.

10 – More than one third (45%) of U.S. adults surveyed plan to purchase a new grill or smoker in 2018, while nearly a third (30%) of current owners plan to grill with greater frequency.

So whether your grilling plan is to sizzle some steaks, honey barbeque some chicken, or slowly smoke some ribs, you are now armed with some interesting grilling tidbits, courtesy of The Storage Inn. Enjoy!





 

Self Storage Unit Discounts for College Students!!

Most students welcome the end of the school year, but for college students here in South Jersey, the summer can create a different kind of stress. Leases are ending, roommates are graduating and moving away, and students are finding themselves in flux, trying to secure housing for the next semester while still enjoying a break from their studies. One way to ease the stress and make the transition smoother is by visiting The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township and renting a self-storage unit. The Storage Inn is offering all college students and their families discounted rates, as well as a free moving truck to help secure their items until the Fall semester!



Here are a few ways that extra storage space can help our college students get through the summer vacation with peace of mind that their items will be safe and sound until the Fall.

Where’s my old room?

Many students return home for the summer, only to find that their parents converted their old bedrooms into a home office, sewing room, or man cave. If you’re a college student planning to spend the summer at home, it could be difficult to fit your belongings beside your mom’s sewing machine, or your family’s movie collection! A better strategy is to put your stuff into self-storage and enjoy your summer with less baggage.

Road Trip!

Some students may keep their apartment or room rental lease intact through the summer, and sublet to another party until the Fall. Even if you get someone to lease your space while you’re out of town, you’ll still want to store your valuables somewhere safe and sound, not to mention that your sub-letter will need space for their own belongings. A self storage rental unit is a safe, secure, and convenient way to store your stuff while you are traveling or working a summer job back home..

Student Sizing

Most college students don’t have a ton of furniture or belongings—or, for that matter, a ton of money—so they don’t need and can’t afford a huge storage unit. Luckily, The Storage Inn Self Storage offers units in 45 different sizes, including many that are no bigger than a single dorm room. Your belongings will feel right at home while you travel, work, or visit friends.

The Storage Inn is proud to offer the college students of South Jersey an affordable way to keep everything safe and secure until the school bells start ringing in September – Let’s not rush things though – Happy Summer Break!

The Storage Shed Needs a Spring Cleaning

Spring has sprung, the grass has riz’ – I wonder where my lawn mower is!?! Looks like it’s time to clean out and organize the shed storage space for the warm weather months. So, let’s get started – first, go to the shed and open the door. Now ask yourself what you could possibly have been thinking when you left it in this condition at the end of last season! Be that as it may, we still need to get organized, so here are a few tips…..

Everything out!
I know, this does not sound like fun, but we need to see exactly what’s in there, what we still need, and what can go. Set aside any items that you no longer need, or that need to be replaced. Also create a group for items that you want to keep, but that don’t necessarily need to be in the shed.

Self Storage Solutions

Clean Up Time
Time to sweep out, and wipe down the floors shelves and work bench areas. You may want to check the items that you are storing to see if they need to be wiped off or hosed down before returning them to the shed.

Re-group and Replace
Now that everything is out, and your space is clean, it’s time to reorganize, and place your items back into the shed. Store the items that will be used most often toward the front of the space. Items that get used less frequently can be stored further back. Leave yourself a path to reach all of your warm weather items when needed. Hanging tools on walls or pegboard, as well as keeping smaller items in cans or plastic containers, can also free up additional storage space. If you find yourself still in need of more storage space for items, such as your Fall fire pit, or those Christmas decorations that you found, you may want to consider a small self-storage space. Your local self-storage facility will be happy to assist!

Now you’re organized and ready to enjoy all of the fun of  lawn mowing, weed whacking, weed pulling, painting, gutter cleaning, hedge trimming, etc…. oh well, hopefully you’ll get to use the bicycles and beach chairs once or twice before winter returns!

Spring Has Sprung!

It’s mid April here at The Storage Inn, and the weather in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, is finally starting to live up to its Spring billing! The temps are creeping into the mid 70’s – The windows in the Storage Rental Office/ Packing Store are open, and I even noticed one of our storage space customers, Mr. Pemberton, wearing shorts and flip-flops! “ Enjoying the weather?” I shouted. Mr. Pemberton replied by yelling back “Spring has sprung!” Yep – Everyone loves Spring!

I’ve heard the expression “Spring has sprung” many times , but it made me wonder if there are other sayings, or famous quotes about the Spring season? I did some investigating and found quite a few that I had never seen or heard before.

“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest..”
–Ernest Hemingway

“It is spring fever. That is what the name of it is. And when you’ve got it, you want–oh, you don’t know quite what it is you do want, but it just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so!”
–Mark Twain

“Always it’s spring and everyone’s in love and flowers pick themselves.”
–E.E. Cummings

“Spring drew on…and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that hope traversed them at night and left each morning brighter traces of her steps.”
–Charlotte Brontë

“Spring’s greatest joy beyond a doubt is when it brings the children out.”
– Edgar Guest

“The promise of spring’s arrival is enough to get anyone through the bitter winter.”
– Jen Selinsky

“Spring is the time of plans and projects.”
– Leo Tolstoy

“Some old-fashioned things like fresh air and sunshine are hard to beat.”
– Laura Ingalls Wilder

“Despite the forecast, live like it’s spring.”
– Lilly Pulitzer

“Springtime is the land awakening. The March winds are the morning yawn.”
– Lewis Grizzard

“A kind word is like a spring day.”
– Russian Proverb

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.”
– Margaret Atwood

“No matter how chaotic it is, wildflowers will still spring up in the middle of nowhere.”
– Sheryl Crow

“Spring is nature’s way of saying, ‘Let’s party.”
– Robin Williams

“An optimist is the human personification of spring.”
– Susan J. Bissonette

So, there you go – some great thoughts on Spring from some famous and even historical figures, courtesy of The Storage Inn. – Happy Spring!

A Very Special Season – Field of Dreams

Spring has sprung here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and the reminders are everywhere! The storage rental office windows are cracked in the afternoon, allowing the spring breeze to flow through, carrying the sounds of chirping birds along.

Spring also brings waves of storage space tenants retrieving warm weather items from their units – stored things like bicycles, sports equipment, and patio furniture seem to be most popular.  All of this spring activity reminds me that nothing says Spring quite like the crack of a baseball bat, or the sound of a ball hitting a glove!

Here at The Storage Inn we are proud to sponsor a very special baseball program in our area – The South Jersey Field of Dreams!

The South Jersey Field of Dreams is a place where physically and mentally challenged children and adults can play and participate in that Great American Pastime – Baseball.  

 

A Little History….

In 2003 the city of Absecon, NJ generously donated a new baseball field at their Dr. Jonathan Pitney Recreation Park for this Field of Dreams. Chuck Dhyne, games director at Field of Dreams, co-founded the league in 2003 with Barry Hackett, Larry McCarty, John Glassey and Jeff Hayden. He said he has seen high school athletes come back year after year to volunteer on weekends for both the spring and fall leagues.

“They get as much out of it as our kids do playing the game, and that’s really nice to see,” he said. “It’s great. They continue to call us to come back the following years and we keep adding additional groups. Most high schools in the area participate.”

The league features 14 teams. Two teams are for ages 6 to 9, four are for ages 10 to 14 and eight are for ages 14 and older.

What started as a dirt infield and backstop now has multiple pavilions, a merchandise stand, concessions stand, courtyard, mini-golf, an exercise trail, and an outfield fence filled with posters of local sponsors.

In 2012, with help from fundraising and a $25,000 donation from Ronald McDonald House Charities, Field of Dreams was upgraded with a state-of-the-art turf field.


Thanks to various sponsors, fundraising, and donations, players and their families don’t even have to pay for concessions on game days.

Dhyne said he enjoys seeing parents watch their children being able to participate in a group activity such as baseball.

“It may be the first time their kids play a team sport,” he said. “They can sit in the stands and watch their kids play a team sport, but they can also network with each other to find out about other programs, and their kids start making friendships on their team.”

“The first week everyone is getting used to it, they’re hitting off the tee. By the second week they’re hitting off the pitcher. By the last week they don’t want anyone to help them,” Miller said. “It’s always great to see the confidence they begin to have, and they make a lot of friends along the way.”

So, while the start of baseball season brings happiness to many Americans, it means something extra special here at The Storage Inn. I will be attending the opening day games, and can’t wait to see the big smiles on all the players and parents faces.

PLAY BALL!!!

Fun Facts From the Storage Inn about Spring!

Spring Has Sprung – Fun Facts!

It’s the third full week of March here at The Storage Inn of Egg Harbor Township, NJ; it’s bright and sunny, but rain, wind, and a chance of snow is in the forecast! and on the first day of Spring no less!

Storage customers continue to shuttle in and out, visiting their storage rental units, and occasionally the office store for storage packing supplies or to rent a moving truck. Regardless of the weather, Spring will be here this week, so here are some Spring Fun Facts from the staff here at The Storage Inn.

Some Fun Facts to “spring” on your friends

• According to a Facebook study, couples are most likely to break up in the spring and two weeks before Christmas. The lowest breakup time was Christmas Day and from August through October.

• On the first day of spring, a person at the North Pole would see the sun skimming across the horizon, beginning six months of uninterrupted daylight. A person at the South Pole would see the sun skimming across the horizon, signaling the start of six months of darkness.

• Spring almost always arrives on March 20 or 21, but sometimes on the 19th. The reason the equinoxes and solstices don’t always come on the same day is that Earth doesn’t circle the sun in exactly 365 days.

• The first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere is the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere.

• If Earth rotated on an axis perpendicular to the plane of its orbit around the sun rather than on a 23.4º tilt, there would be no variation in day lengths and no variation in seasons.

• Easter always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox.

• The first spring flowers are typically lilacs, irises, lilies, tulips, daffodils, and dandelions.

• The myth that it is possible to balance an egg on its end on the spring equinox is just that: a myth. Trying to balance an oval-shaped object on its end is no easier on the spring equinox than on any other day.

• For the Japanese, the opening of the cherry blossom, Japan’s national flower, in March or April signals the start of spring.

• The term “spring fever” refers to a both psychological and physiological symptoms associated with the arrival of spring, including restlessness, daydreaming, and increased sexual appetite. While the exact cause is unclear, scientists believe that increased light, more exercise, and more bare skin influence hormone levels.

• In the Southern Hemisphere, springtime lasts from August until November.

• During the spring, birds are more vocal as they sing to attract mates and warn away rivals.

• According to the National Association of Realtors, spring is the most popular season to sell/buy a house. Buyers are usually hesitant to move during the winter when the weather is colder and kids are in school. So, while there are lots of houses to choose from in the spring, property prices are at their highest then.

• Children actually grow faster in the spring than during other times of the year.

• The early Egyptians built the Great Sphinx so that it points directly toward the rising sun on the spring equinox.

• Tornadoes are most common in the spring and least common in winter.

• Every year on the first day of spring, people in Poland gather to burn an effigy and throw it in the river to bid winter farewell.

• Honey Bees are more likely to swarm during the spring. They swarm as a way to start new colonies from successful ones. Surprisingly, swarming Honey Bees are very docile and the most friendly they will ever be all year.

So there you have it – a few fun facts about Spring, courtesy of your friends here at The Storage Inn. One more fun fact – Spring is the best time to get a great deal on that extra storage space you’ve been needing for soooo long. I just happen to know a great place……

Don’t forget to adjust your clocks for Daylight Savings Time 2018!

Time to Spring Forward!

March has come in like a lion here at The Storage Inn in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, but that hasn’t stopped our storage unit rental customers from buzzing about as they rearrange their storage units for spring use. I noticed, as I flipped our storage space rental office calendar over to the month of March, that Daylight Savings Time begins this month. “Spring Forward” I thought to myself – ugh! – One less hour of sleep on Saturday night. Oh well, at least it means that spring is on the way, and we will have more light during the evening hours. This all made me wonder where Daylight Savings Time came from, and how long we’ve been tinkering with the universe’s internal clock!

What Is Daylight Saving Time?
DST is a seasonal time change where clocks are set ahead of standard time by 1 hour. As a result, the Sun rises and sets later than the day before. Daylight Saving Time (DST) is used to save energy and make better use of daylight.

Oh Canada!
It was first used in 1908 in Canada where on July 1, 1908, the residents of Port Arthur, Ontario turned their clocks forward by 1 hour to start the world’s first DST period.

Other locations in Canada soon followed suit. On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba did so on April 24, 1916. Daylight Saving Time in Regina proved so popular that laws were passed to bring DST into effect automatically.

DST Spreads to Europe
Daylight Saving Time did not catch on globally until Germany introduced it in 1916. Two years into World War I, clocks in the German Empire, and its ally Austria, were turned ahead by 1 hour in an effort to minimize the use of artificial lighting, and save fuel for the war effort. Within a few weeks, the United Kingdom, France, and many other countries followed suit.

Who Invented DST?
If you like Daylight Saving Time, you can thank New Zealand scientist George Vernon Hudson and British builder William Willett. In 1895, Hudson presented a paper to the Wellington Philosophical Society, proposing a 2-hour shift forward in October and a 2-hour shift back in March. There was interest in the idea, but it was never followed through.

Then in 1905, British builder William Willett suggested setting the clocks ahead 20 minutes on each of the four Sundays in April, and switching them back by the same amount on each of the 4 Sundays in September, a total of 8 time switches per year. Willett’s Daylight Saving plan was introduced in a bill to the House of Commons in February 1908, however, the idea was opposed by many, especially farmers. Willett died in 1915, the year before the United Kingdom passed the bill into law.

DST in the USA
Daylight Saving Time  was not formally adopted in the U.S. until 1918. “An Act to preserve daylight and provide standard time for the United States” was enacted on March 19, 1918. The new bill established standard time zones and set summer DST to begin on March 31, 1918.

Daylight Saving Time is now used in over 70 countries worldwide and affects over 1 billion people every year.

Here at The Storage Inn, the onset of Daylight Saving Time brings with it storage customers, old and new, packing away the winter items, and pulling out their lawn chairs, barbecue grills, and bicycles from their storage units. Yep – Warm weather and late sunsets are almost here – Don’t forget to “Spring Forward” !

The Storage Inn investigates South Jersey’s Underground Railroad

South Jersey’s Underground Railroad

Its mid February at The Storage Inn Self Storage here in Egg Harbor Township New Jersey, and we’ve already been through Groundhog Day, Mardi Gras, and Valentine’s Day. February, however, is also a month-long celebration of our nation’s Black History. The Storage Inn is located just outside Atlantic City, New Jersey, a city rich in Black History – Club Harlem, Chicken Bone Beach, and the Boardwalk Empire Prohibition Era come to mind immediately, but what many people don’t know, is that Atlantic and Cape May counties in southern New Jersey were integral in the success of the Underground Railroad in the mid 1800’s.

This was brought to light by one of our storage customers who happens to be the curator for the Black History section of the Atlantic City Heritage Collections at the resort’s public library. Below are the highlights of our conversation regarding the underground railroad in our area.

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used in the 19th century by slaves to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.



These safe houses were located in small communities, so those seeking freedom could go from town to town without anyone noticing them, For slaves using the Underground Railroad to escape the south, reaching Atlantic and Cape May counties offered hope that the journey to freedom might soon be over.

Communities such as Somers Point and Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County offered those escaping slavery a direct path to Pennsylvania, a state that had already outlawed slavery.

“The goal of slaves on the Underground Railroad was to make it to Pennsylvania, so when they got to Egg Harbor City, NJ they knew that freedom was just days away. I’m sure that many people don’t realize how much of an impact South Jersey had on the Underground Railroad,” said Ava, our curator.

Cape May also played a prominent role in the Underground Railroad. Cape May sits directly across the Bay from Delaware and Maryland. During that time, land crossings were actually more difficult than water crossings, so places that had water access became more popular.



Cape May was known to those seeking freedom, as a place with safe locations that they could count on.


Finding reliable numbers for escaped slaves who traveled through New Jersey, let alone Atlantic County, has proven tricky. The national estimate for those who used the Underground Railroad as a path to freedom is between 30,000 and 40,000 escapees.

You know, they say that you learn something new everyday, and today I learned something that makes me just a bit more proud of the South Jersey area!  Until the next time!